Facts about China: HEALTH, OBESITY, & SMOKING

China Mike’s 100% verified, no B.S. China facts (interesting & fun statistics):


CHINA LIFE EXPECTANCY & HEALTH CARE


China’s life expectancy at birth:
Total population: 74.68 years (#96 world ranking)
Male: 72.68 years
Female: 76.94 years
[ CIA World Factbook, 2011 est. ]


Life expectancy in China was only around 35 years in 1949, when the Communist Party took control of the country.
[ Wikipedia “History of the People’s Republic of China 1949–1976” ]

Source: BBC News


China is building “an extensive health care system to cover nearly all of its 1.3 billion people”. The government’s three-year plan has invested US$123 billion to “establish universal health care” to provide “some form of medical insurance for 90% of the population by 2011”.
[Time “What Asia Can Really Teach America” Feb. 2010; New York Times “China Announces Subsidies for Health Care” Jan. 21, 2009 ]


By 2020, all Chinese citizens should have access to basic health services, according to the government. The government estimates that today about 90% of rural people are enrolled in its insurance program, which requires them to pay premiums.
[ Wall Street Journal “China to Revamp Health Care” April 8, 2009 ]


More than 40 percent of total health spending goes to medicines in China, a disproportionately high amount compared to most other countries, according to World Bank research.
[ CNS News “China Tackles Health Care Reform” March 9, 2011 ]

China facts: OBESITY EXPLOSION


China “has entered the era of obesity,” according to Ji Chengye, a leading child-health researcher, who says that “the speed of growth is shocking.”
[ USA Today “Obesity of China’s kids stuns officials” Jan. 9. 2007 ]

Urban Chinese boys age 6 are 2.5 inches taller and 6.6 pounds heavier on average than Chinese city boys 30 years ago, according to China’s Health Ministry. The Education Ministry reports that 8% of 10- to 12-year-olds in China’s cities are obese, with an additional 15% classified as overweight.
[ USA Today “Obesity of China’s kids stuns officials” Jan. 9. 2007 ]


China’s “obesity explosion” has resulted in growth of Chinese fat camps, which costs about a thousand U.S. dollars (U.S.) per child.
[ National Geographic News “Obesity Explosion May Weigh on China’s Future” August 8, 2006 ]



About 15% of Chinese adults—or 200 million people—are classified as overweight. Of these, 90 million—about 7 percent—are obese.
[ National Geographic News “Obesity Explosion May Weigh on China’s Future” August 8, 2006 ]


Nearly 100 million Chinese people are obese, according to official statistics. British economist Paul French and author of “Fat China” explained: “In the last 30 years they’ve gone from famine to feast in just two generations”.
[ Fox News “Obesity Rates Soar in China With Greater Wealth” July 1, 2010 ]


Between 5 percent and 10 percent of Chinese youth are now obese, according to the World Health Organization. The “dramatic increase in obesity” has resulted from the China’s “growing class of educated and well-paid consumers (who) adopt some Western-style shopping and eating habits.”
[ WHO; PBS Newshour “For China’s Growing Middle Class, Expanding Waistlines Pose Problem” June 1, 2010 ]



Click here to see the “McDonald’s & KFC exploding in China” in China Facts: CONSUMERS.


About 8.1% of Chinese children in urban areas are obese, compared to 3.1% in rural areas.
[ National Geographic News “Obesity Explosion May Weigh on China’s Future” August 8, 2006 ]


China’s obesity rate is exploding—about 30 to 50 percent annually (or six million to 10 million more obese every year).
[ PBS Newshour “For China’s Growing Middle Class, Expanding Waistlines Pose Problem” June 1, 2010 ]


About one in 10 adults in China have diabetes (representing about 90 million diabetics).
[ BBC News “China faces obesity explosion” Sept. 25, 2010 ]

But China still has a long way to go...("We're #1! We're #1!")


CHINA SMOKING STATISTICS & ATTITUDES




China is the world’s largest consumer and producer of tobacco. China has about 350 million smokers and produces 42% of the all cigarettes in the world.
[ WHO; Wikipedia “Smoking in the People’s Republic of China” ]


One of every three cigarettes consumed around the world is smoked in China.
[ WHO website ]


More than 300 million Chinese adults smoke—among them more than half of all Chinese men.
[ Newsweek “Smoking All the Profits” Feb. 13, 2011 ]


Over half of Chinese males over 15 years old are smokers, compared to only 2.4% of women.
[ WHO Global Adult Tobacco Survey; Wall Street Journal “China’s Smoking Habit: Inhaling the Numbers” Aug. 17, 2010 ]



Among China’s youth, about a third of male teens smoke and nearly 8% of females.
[ WHO website ]


Only 59% of Chinese smokers believe that Chinese society disapproves of smoking, the fourth lowest rate of 14 countries surveyed by the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC).
[ITC China Summary, February 2009 ]


Less than a quarter of Chinese people—both smokers and non-smokers—believe that smoking causes lung cancer and other diseases.
[ WHO Global Adult Tobacco Survey; Wall Street Journal “China’s Smoking Habit: Inhaling the Numbers” Aug. 17, 2010 ]


Almost 60% of male doctors in China are smokers, representing the highest percentage of smoking doctors in the world.
[ China Daily “Smoke-free list extends to healthcare facilities” Dec. 11, 2009, Wikipedia “Smoking in the People’s Republic of China” ]


A 2004 survey found that 42% of Chinese male surgeons had reported smoking in front of their patients.
[ Wikipedia “Smoking in the People’s Republic of China” ]


China only banned smoking in hospitals in 2009 (to go into full effect 2011). However, the laws do not specify any fines or punishments for offenders.
[ China Daily “Smoke-free list extends to healthcare facilities” Dec. 11, 2009, Wikipedia “Smoking in the People’s Republic of China” ]


In a 2010 WHO poll, 38% reported that they have seen smoking inside health-care facilities.
[ WHO Global Adult Tobacco Survey; Wall Street Journal “China’s Smoking Habit: Inhaling the Numbers” Aug. 17, 2010 ]

SMOKING-RELATED DEATHS IN CHINA




An estimated 2 million Chinese people will die each year of tobacco-related illnesses by 2020 if current smoking rates continue (up from 1.2 million in 2011), according to a Jan. 2011 report by a panel of Chinese and international health experts and economists.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


By 2030, the above figure is expected to rise to a staggering 3.5 million deaths each year — which would account for nearly half the world’s annual smoking-related deaths.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]

CHINA SMOKING BAN & TOBACCO INDUSTRY


The Chinese government made a pledge to enact a nationwide smoking ban in indoor public spaces by the start of 2011, in accordance with the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which went into effect in China in January 2006.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


During the five years from 2006-2011, the government has done “next to nothing to carry out the ban.” In announcing the missed deadline, the state mouthpiece, Xinhua News Agency, blamed “a lack of state-level legislation, ineffective administration, low-priced cigarettes and a deep-rooted tobacco culture.” However, anti-smoking advocates say “the real fault lies with China’s powerful tobacco industry”.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


Anti-smoking advocates say that “the real fault lies with China’s powerful tobacco industry”. Experts say that there is “a deep conflict of interest within the government: the State Tobacco Monopoly Administration (STMA) is responsible for both running the world’s largest cigarette maker, the China National Tobacco Corp., and carrying out the country’s anti-smoking laws.”
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


The China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC) is the world’s largest producer of tobacco products, accounting for about 30% of global supply. The CNTC enjoys a “virtual monopoly” in China.
[ Wikipedia “China National Tobacco Corp” ]


Tax payments from the tobacco industry account for an estimated 8% of the central government revenues each year.
[ Wall Street Journal “China’s Smoking Habit: Inhaling the Numbers” Aug. 17, 2010 ]


In 2010, China’s Big Tobacco paid 498.85 billion yuan (around $75 billion) in taxes to the Chinese government, according to the State Tobacco Monopoly Administration. In 2009, the China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC) produced 2.3 trillion cigarettes.
[ Newsweek “Smoking All the Profits” Feb. 13, 2011 ]


China’s tobacco industry has “actively tried to thwart antismoking efforts”. When the government approved a cigarette-tax hike in 2009, Chinese tobacco companies simply absorbed the cost to keep the price of cigarettes stable. The companies have also sidestepped a ban on tobacco advertising by donating money to charity. One school rebuilt with tobacco money in quake-ravaged Sichuan province now carries the name of a local cigarette brand: the Sichuan Tobacco Hope Primary School.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


Tobacco “overall poses a loss rather than a benefit to China,” according to a 2011 report by China’s Center for Disease Control. Other research puts estimated costs from tobacco at about 25% greater than the revenue generated by the industry.
[ Newsweek “Smoking All the Profits” Feb. 13, 2011 ]



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